Spartacus

Watch the story of history’s greatest gladiator unfold with graphic violence and the passions of the women that love them. This is Spartacus. Last week I finally finished watch the whole Spartacus saga. I had watched the first season back when it was on the telly, but had never finished the whole saga. So I […]

Hercules [based on the comic]

Is Hercules the son of Zeus or is he just a man? This film takes a more realistic1 interpretation of the hero. Sure, he performed many incredible feats. But in this film he is helped out by his band of plucky killers and his legend is enhanced by his nephew’s story-telling. It never hurts to […]

Spartacus : Gods of the arena

First things first, this is an awesome show. Awesome! Anyone who says different is just plain wrong!

When I first started watching Spartacus : Blood and Sand I have to say that I wasn’t overly impressed. Obviously influenced by the style and look of 300 it seemed to be a show that existed only to show glossy violence and sex. And boy did it ever show that. But after the first few episodes it developed into a very enjoyable, almost addictive, show. But then its star was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and so film making was delayed as he underwent treatment. And so instead of a second season we got a prequel. Spartacus : gods of the arena. Don’t be fooled by that name in the title, this has no Spartacus as all, instead it tells the story of how John Hannah’s Lentulus Batiatus comes to run the family ludus, and how Crixus becomes a gladiator.

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Ilium

ISBN: 9780380817924 DDC: The first in the Ilium/Olympusduology. Author site ; Ilium sectionof the Ilium/Olympus wiki Ilium opens with Thomas Hockenberry, a twenty-first century professor, observing the Trojan War on behalf of a Muse. He has been reborn into this world of heroes and gods at the whim of a god or goddess and exists […]

Clash of the Titans

The film opens at sea, in a storm. A fisherman hauls in an ornate box and after prising it open finds a baby boy and his dead mother. He and his wife raise this child as their own, loving him just as much as their flesh and blood daughter, whom they bear some years later. We know this because Pete Postlethwaite tells us so. This boy, Perseus, does not know it, but he is a demi-god, the son of Zeus himself. And he is about to get caught up in a conflict between humanity and the Gods of Ancient Greece.

Black Ships

Image of Black Ships
ISBN: 9781841496993
See also: Delicious Links

You must know that, despite all else I am, I am of the People.

This is one of those books that I’ve spotted several times in book shops and thought about picking up. But every time that little voice said to me “No more books! You’re moving soon, do you really want more stuff to carry around” and so I’d resist. But yesterday I had to take a train journey. With no mp3 player and no reading material. So I popped into Easons first. And there I picked up this book. To be totally honest, its the cover that always attracts me. There is just something about it that makes me pick this book up and flicking through it. I never even read the back of the book. I read the opening few pages and figured, what the hell, its can’t hurt, and added yet another book to my shelves. And so I have my first book of this year’s Once Upon a Time[1] challenge.

Because I hadn’t read the back I didn’t realise that this is a retelling of The Aeneid, not that it really matters, I’ve never read Virgil. I was vaguely familiar with some aspects of the story line, but other I knew nothing about. Okay, most of it I knew nothing about. Maybe that helped me enjoy the book more because I wasn’t thinking “that’s not in Virgil”? Or maybe if I had read it I would be all “ooohh, I like how that was changed”? Either way I did like the book. A lot.

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Linknotes:

  1. this is slightly a cheat, Im still not sure what else Im reading for the challenge but Im sure I will find something

Achilles

Two rivers. Flowing in contrary directions.
Two layers of water, each moving steadily, separate and self-possessed.

When I was thinking of books to read for the myth section of Carl’s challenge I did consider the Iliad, and the Odyssey too, so when I was wandering around the library and stumbled across this book it seemed perfect. And I’m so glad I picked it up; it makes for a really good read.

Rome 2.6 Philippi

We start off this episode with Brutus and Cassius riding along with their army. Brutus is in good form, he has been chatting with the men, but Cassius is a tad on the grumpy side, all these mouths to feed. Brutus tells him he has such an unromantic view of the army. They are marching to take on Caesar/Octavian, for the good of the republic[1] Read more about Rome 2.6 Philippi

Linknotes:

  1. – Anyone remember those in the national interest sketches from Bull Island?

Rome 2.5 Heroes of the Republic

After the excitement of the last episode it seems that Timon has refound religion[1] as this episode begins with him and his brother praying at Temple. I do wonder will this last[2] But there isn’t too much time to think about this as soon we switch attention to Mark Anthony in the woods. With a beard. And a nasty, nasty beard it is too. So nasty we don’t really spend much time watching him gut the deer he’s been hunting. Instead we return to Lamb and Chicken, and the rescued children. Chicken suggests that they maybe shouldn’t return to the life of crime[3] and brutality, seeing as Anthony isn’t around and his orders really don’t stand. Lamb, of course, is steadfast in his duty and says that of course they will take up their old duties, keeping the peace through mafia-esque activities on the Avantine[4] While they discuss this, and meet up with some soldiers who fill in all the details about Caesar, we switch attention to the children in the back of the wagon. They are planning to run away, but must wait until they can make some money.

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Linknotes:

  1. he must have had SOME religion in the first place so all I think that refound is accurate
  2. and indeed, what it will lead to. Nothing good and happy I’m betting
  3. he really has turned quite sensible
  4. order through chaos! peace through crime! etc