Susan Hated Literature

She'd much prefer to read a good book

Tag: 8 Stars

Rainbow Pie by

a memoir of Redneck America ISBN: 9781846272578 It happens perhaps once of twice every August: a deep West Virginia sundown…

Singled out by

Full title: Singled Out: How Two Million British Women Survived Without Men After the First World War ISBN: 9780670915644 In…

The Grudge by

Full title The Grudge : Scotland vs. England, 1990 ISBN: 9780224082761 JIM Telfer often said that if he’d been knocking…

Lady of Quality by

Miss Annis Wychwood is in her late twenties, and as she is still unmarried, she believes her future to hold nothing but remaining single. However she is not about to retreat into the clutches of her brother’s family and become “the spinster aunt”, as much as she loves her sister-in-law, there are some things which simply can not be allowed to happen. So she has set up home in Bath, with an elderly cousin to live with her, for propriety’s sake. On a journey from her brother’s establishment to her own, she comes across a broken down chaise and offers her assistance. The young woman she rescues is most thankful for not being left at the side of the road, but things are about to change in Miss Wychwood’s life, for she is the ward of Mr. Oliver Carleton, and she has run away.

Okay, anyone who has ever read any Georgette Heyer will probably already know that Miss Wychwood shall not remain single. And that she will end up falling madly in love with Carleton, and that they will live happily ever after. But speculation about that aspect of the plot is not why anyone reads Heyer. Instead you read her to enjoy her writing, her characters, and her dialogue. And in all those aspects this book is a success.

Blameless by

by Gail Carriger
If you haven’t yet read Soulless and Changeless then I am afraid that this review will contain spoilers for those two books. Always the way with reviewing books in a series.
I’ve just realised that I’ve never really mentioned the covers in my review of these books, but just take a second to take a proper look at them. Aren’t they wonderful! I’m not sure if that is exactly how I picture Alexia, she always seems, how would she put it, more substantial than the model on the cover, but the are so very appropriate. And just look at that othnithopter over Paris. Oops, spoilers, because yes, Alexia heads to France and then on to Italy. How exciting.

Changeless by

by Gail Carriger

If you haven’t yet read Soulless then I am afraid that this review will contain spoilers. It is the second book in a series after all. However, the spoilers are, in a way, not spoilers, because you pretty much knew what was going to happen simply becasue of the conventions of a romance. But nevertheless, consider your self warned.

Soulless ended with Alexia becoming Lady Maccoon after marrying Conall Maccon, as well as muhjah to Queen Victoria. Muhjah being the traditional preternatural advisor to the monarch, alongside a hiveless vampire and a packless werewolf. Changeless begins with her husband disappearing off to Scotland after his old pack. A strange lack of supernatural ability in London. And Alexia following Conall to Scotland on the trail of whatever caused the temporary supernatural-less-ness. And she travels on a dirigible. How very steampunk!

Myths about suicide by

What do you think when you hear that someone has committed suicide? Many probably wonder why? and then begin to speculate. Some will accuse the suicide victim of being selfish, or cowardly and not being able to live. But for Joiner these responses are not answers. They are myths. He has researched this topic at great lengths, and he also has personal experience, as his father committed suicide. As did his maternal grandfather. In this book he lists the main myths that people use to try and explain suicide, and then he debunks them.

Soulless by

by Gail Carriger
Miss Alexia Tarabotti was not enjoying her evening.

And the reason for Miss Tarabotti’s lack of enjoyment it that she was promised refreshment at a private ball, and when it didn’t arrive she absconded to the library and ordered some tea. And while there she was attacked by a vampire. How rude!

Bedelia by

by Vera Caspary
It is Christmas, 1913 and Charlie Horst sees himself as the luckiest man in the world. He has a beautiful wife who completes his life. And this is to be their first Christmas together. Bedelia, whose whole life revolves around making her husband happy, has decorated their home lavishly for their Christmas party. But a new neighbour, Ben Chaney, begins to show an interest in Bedelia and her past. And then there is Charlie’s case of “severe indigestion”. Is there more to Bedelia than meets the eye? Could she possibly be “the wickedest woman who ever loved”?

The man who lives with wolves by ,

I first heard of Shaun Ellis when I watched the Natural Geographic documentary on him and his theories about how playing recordings of wolf packs can stop wolf attacks on farm animals. It worked in Poland, but Ellis has no science-biology background so his theories aren’t really accepted. Wolves have always been among my favourite animals, so I guess I was always going to be interested, like the way I’ll always watch those animal rescue shows, even when I know they’re bound to be all overly dramatic and manipulative.

The Passage by

Before she became the Girl from Nowhere-the One Who Walked In, the First and Last and Only, who lived a thousand years-she was just a little girl in Iowa, named Amy.

Usually in my reviews I tend to start off with a quick plot summary. But any sort of recap would risk spoiling aspects of the story, so I’ll instead start off with an introduction. The Passage begins with the story of Amy Harper Bellafonte. Harper because her mother’s favourite book was To Kill a Mockingbird. Amy’s mother is a waitress, her father a businessman who drifted through, left and, some time later returned. To the detriment of all. In the end Amy is left at a convent with a nun. And the next chapter tells us, through a series of emails, about an expedition to discover how to end death.

Inception dir. by

Hmmm, how to review a film where you really don’t want to talk about the plot because you might give…

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