An oil strike is visible in the distance, the soil is red and barren.

Killers of the Flower Moon

If you want to read a book that’ll really show how horrific people can be to one another then this is it. It tells the story of the murders of Mollie Burkhart’s family. They were all members of the Osage tribe; in the 1920s they were among the richest people in the world. And yet […]

Welcome to your authentic Indian experience

Published in Apex Magazine, August 2017 This is one of those short stories that I just didn’t gel with, I think I needed it to be longer… defeats to purpose of a short story, I know, but I needed to know a bit more about the ending. This isn’t, I don’t think, and problem with […]

The truth about stories

From what I remember I bought this book a few years ago because of Aarti’s A More Diverse Universe reading challenge. I didn’t get around to reading it then, but for some reason it popped out at me when I went to shelve a different book. So I picked it up and started reading. It […]

The last report on the miracles at Little No Horse

For years now Father Damien has been writing to the pope. He is looking for answers, for hope, for guidance. So when, at long last, Father Jude arrives one day Damien thinks his letters have been answered. Eighty years earlier Sister Cecilia left the convent and became Agnes. Music, especially playing the piano, distracted her […]

Ghost Hawk

Little Hawk is about to leave his family and village to go into the woods and live alone for three months, a ritual that will see him in his way to manhood. But life if changing for his tribe, and for all Native Americans. The European settlement of America is well under way and with […]

A more diverse universe blog tour

Today, being the 27th of September is supposed to be the day that I post my review of The Way of Thorn and Thunder: The Kynship Chronicles’ by Daniel Heath Justice. But I was stupid and didn’t consider the fact that this is a trilogy of books published in one book and so, it is […]

Black Hills

Author: Dan Simmons

I’d never read any of Dan Simmons work before picking this one up. I’d heard good things about Drood but that’s about it. So picking this up was a total impulse decision. I hadn’t heard anything about the book, and I don’t really trust blurbs.

In the opening sentence we meet our main protagonist, Paha Sapa, a young Lakota boy who has raced into the middle of the Battle of Little Big Horn in order to go counting coup, there he touches the dying George Custer, the infamous Long Hair, and from then on shares his mind with Custer’s ghost. The book shifts in time, usually within Paha Sapa’s life, but occasionally we get to hear from Custer. He usually talks about his wife, Libby, and the sex they had. To be totally honest this was the one bit I wasn’t that interested in. Okay, so he and his wife have a great sex life, and so…
The rest of the book though, well, it is one I recommend you take a look at.

One Thousand White Women

23 March 1875
Today is my birthday, and I have received the greatest gift of all – freedom! I make these first poor scribblings aboard the westbound Union Pacific train with departed Union Station Chicago at 6.35 a.m. this morning, bound for Nebraska Territory.

In 1854 a Cheyenne chief asked the United States government for one thousand white brides to marry into the people. Cheyenne society was a matrilineal society the resulting children, to their minds, would belong to white society. Yet they would also have an understanding of Cheyenne ways, and so it seemed a good way of joining white man’s society. Of course this didn’t go down to well in the white man’s world, and the offer was refused.

In this novel Fergus imagines what would have happened had the US govt decided to go along with this Cheyenne idea. In secret, of course.

Moon Dance

ISBN: 0812511271Have no real idea why I bothered to buy this book. I picked it up, read the blurb and knew it wouldn’t be good. After all on the front cover is an extract from a Locus review:

A historical romance, a Dickensian chronicle, of the American West, and a brutally violent werewolf epic… Moon Dance is simply one of the finest fantasy novels of the year

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