Eagle in the snow

Banished to the Empire’s farthest outpost, veteran warrior Paulinus Maximus defends The Wall of Britannia from the constant onslaught of belligerent barbarian tribes. Bravery, loyalty, experience, and success lead to Maximus’ appointment as “General of the West” by the Roman emperor, the ambition of a lifetime. But with the title …

A Wind in Cairo

Tarr presents a historical fantasy set in Egypt in the 12th century about a young man who is turned into a horse for punishment and must undergo harsh lessons in order to be returned to human form. (blurb from Goodreads) I decided to read this book based on the author’s …

The curious history of Irish dogs

There are nine breeds of dog that are native to Ireland: four terriers, three gun dogs, and two hounds. In The Curious History of Irish Dogs, David Blake Knox tells the remarkable stories of each of the nine breeds, and reveals how they have become inextricably linked with the people …

Testosterone Rex : unmaking the myths of our gendered minds

Rec’d back in Feb by Aarti on Twitter. Testosterone Rex brings together evolutionary science, psychology, neuroscience and social history to move beyond old ‘nature versus nurture’ debates, and to explain why it’s time to unmake the tyrannical myth of Testosterone Rex. (Testosterone Rex: Unmaking the Myths of Our Gendered Minds …

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

January 1946: London is emerging from the shadow of the Second World War, and writer Juliet Ashton is looking for her next book subject. Who could imagine that she would find it in a letter from a man she’s never met, a native of the island of Guernsey, who has …

March Mount TBR

Bible, Jake – Stone Cold Bastards, added because of the author’s big idea piece on Scalzi’s blog ““Old school, crack military team of gargoyles holds a Sanctuary against a Demon Siege“ Vickers, Roy – The Department of Dead Ends, rec’d by Tip the Wink – Once started I couldn’t put …

The truth about stories

From what I remember I bought this book a few years ago because of Aarti’s A More Diverse Universe reading challenge. I didn’t get around to reading it then, but for some reason it popped out at me when I went to shelve a different book. So I picked it …

The Ninth Rain

The blurb for this book is very accurate as to the tone and feel of the book. It has all those epic fantasy tropes – a once great civilisation fallen to ruin, a loner adventure – but then it undercuts that with the “talk about a guilt trip” and introduces a more real grounded feel to the story, plus a bit of humour. And if I had to describe The Ninth Rain in a few words, then epic fantasy with added humour, would certainly be a large part of it.