Tagged: US author

Stray by

Okay, first off the cover to this is awful. Really, it is. And second of all, I did have huge problems...

Grave’s end by

In 1982 Elaine Mercado and her family moved from an apartment into what they hoped would be their dream home. This...

Dark Jenny by

Sitting in Angelina’s Tavern, Eddie LaCrosse’s winter evening is suddenly disturbed by a delivery. The delivery of a coffin to be...

Blackout by

Set in the same ‘verse as Doomsday Book and To say nothing of the dog this is a book about historians....

Ship Breaker by

Nailer is a ship breaker, one of those who make their living from scavenging the ships left over from the Accelerated...

Behemoth by

The sequel to Leviathan No recapping on account of this being the second in a series, and if you haven’t read...

The borrower by

The Borrower

I’ll admit I picked this book up because I liked the tagline, She borrowed a child. He stole her. Lucy Hull who is a children’s librarian runs away with Ian Drake when she finds him hiding out in the library one morning. She’s always enjoyed him when he visited the library, even if she did worry over his mother and the insistance that Ian only be allowed borrow books with the “breath of God” in them. And definitely not those ones with magic and satanism in them!

And then Lucy finds a note making her believe that Ian is being sent to anti-gay classes. She isn’t really kidnapping him, she is rescuing him.

The hum and the shiver by

hum and the shiver

Bronwyn Hyatt is coming home. A war hero. Or so some people say, others say she hasn’t changed a speck from the trash Tufa slut she was before she left, but to her family all that is important is that she is home. Back among the Tufa. And who are the Tufa? Well that no on seems quite sure of. They’ve been in the mountains of east Tennessee since before anyone can remember. Closely knit, and prizing musical ability, they live apart from other people. And Bronwyn is a true, pure-blooded Tufa, a First Daughter. But a haint is visiting, and there are ominus signs everywhere her people look.

Old Burnside by

A memoir of a Southern Girlhoodold burnside

In 1913 Harriette Simpson Arnow moved to Old Burnside, Kentucky, with her family. This is her recollections of life in the once bustling lumber town. She was only four years old at the time, and yet she still manages to recreate the town and people she knew back then. It is a small book, only 125 pages in the edition I read, but there is plenty going on.