A photo of a woman in a blue dress seated in a prison cell

Alias Grace

Based on the true story of Grace Marks, an infamous murderer in Canada in the 1840’s, Atwood’s book uses different narrators to tell the story, as well as interspersing the story with extracts from other works. From poems, fiction, newspapers of the time, and other sources. Although this is based on the real story, Atwood has, of course, fictionalised a great deal of the novel.

The two narrators are Grace herself, who tells her story in the first person, past tense, and Simon Jordan, the doctor investigating her claims of insanity or innocence. His parts are told by a third person narrator, and are in the present tense.

from Mayhem

But how can you trust anyone’s story? Every story, including mine, is an enactment of what we wish to be true, an edited version of our selves. Mayhem: a memoir

We are all completely beside ourselves

Rosemary Cooke is at college in California. She has no real friends to speak of. Her house mate Ted, maybe, but she isn’t sure. Then she encounters Harlow, a drama student who excels at drama. As in, over the top drama of day to day living. When they first meet both end up getting arrested. […]

The Haunting of Hill House

Part of my RIP reading, and read with The Estella Society’s Readalong. Hill House is unoccupied. The owners have tried to rent it, but tenants never stay long. The house has an 80 year history that includes deaths and strange goings on. It is just the sort of house Dr John Montague has been looking […]

The little stranger - Sarah Waters

The Little Stranger

Read for this year’s RIP event. Part of The Estella Society’s readalong, although a much delayed addition. The story opens with a happy scene at Hundreds Hall, our narrator is remembering how grand the house was. How impressive it was to a small child visiting from a poor family. Thirty years later when Doctor Faraday […]

The islanders - Christopher Priest

The Islanders

I have no idea what to say about this book. I have no idea what it is all about. But I suppose I should make some sort of an effort. The Islanders is not really a story, it is a travel guide. A guidebook to the Dream Archipelego, and of course I haven’t yet read […]

Code name Verity

reread 24th Sept 2018 for my bookclub. And on rereading I still really enjoyed this book. I still think that some of it is a little forced, and the first person narrator telling a third person story is a little contrived. But I still loved it and would highly recommend it. I’m not sure the […]

The therapist

Martin Kobel specialises in helping people. That’s his job, as a therapist, people in need come to him and he helps them. And when he bumps into Annabelle Young at a cafe he sees in her someone he can help. But she hasn’t asked him for help, he passes her his card, hoping that will prompt her to ask for assistance. That doesn’t work. And she is a teacher, her trouble could easily damage a whole class of young impressionable children. He has to do something.

The Wise Man’s Fear

ISBN: 9780575088078
The Kingkiller Chronicle, Day two
Read for the Once Upon a Time V reading challenge, see what every one’s been reading on the review site ; Quotes I liked are on Tumblr.

Bast slouched against the long stretch of mahogany bar, bored.

The second book in the Kingkiller Chronicle takes off when book one ended, it is the second day of Kvothe’s tale. Today we learn more about his time in the university, as well as his gap year, for lack of a better word. He heads off to travel and expand his mind.

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Drood

ISBN: 978184727957

On the 9th of June, 1865, ten passengers were killed when a train crashed at Staplehurst. Among the passengers who survived the disaster was the novelist Charles Dickens. Meeting his friend, Wilkie Collins, soon afterwards Dickens describes a strange individual he came across at the site of the crash. This man, Drood, is to drag both Dickens and Collins into the depths of Victorian London’s criminal and poverty stricken underbelly. Will he also lead to murder and insanity?

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An instance of the fingerpost

ISBN: 009975181x
Read with HistoricalFavorites

Marco da Cola, gentleman of Venice, respectfully presents his greetings.

This was a wonderful read. When I first started it I had no idea[1] what to expect; I knew nothing about it apart from the fact that it was an Historical Favorites pick and so, most likely, an historical novel :). It opens with Marco da Cola setting down his recollections of his time spent in England. He travelled over in an attempt to help with his family’s business troubles. However there was little he could do and soon he found himself in Oxford among the professionals there and became embroiled in the case of Sarah Blundy, and the possible murder of Robert Grove. As well as delving into medical experiments with blood transfusion.

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Linknotes:

  1. I didnt even know what the title meant, not really