Tagged: unreliable narrator

Beast dir. by

If you are anything like me, you hear a film called Beast and think of Beauty and the Beast. And then you see the main character...

Alias Grace by

Based on the true story of Grace Marks, an infamous murderer in Canada in the 1840’s, Atwood’s book uses different narrators to tell the story, as well as interspersing the story with extracts from other works. From poems, fiction, newspapers of the time, and other sources. Although this is based on the real story, Atwood has, of course, fictionalised a great deal of the novel.

The two narrators are Grace herself, who tells her story in the first person, past tense, and Simon Jordan, the doctor investigating her claims of insanity or innocence. His parts are told by a third person narrator, and are in the present tense.

from Mayhem by

But how can you trust anyone’s story? Every story, including mine, is an enactment of what we wish to be true, an edited version of our...

The Little Stranger by

Read for this year’s RIP event. Part of The Estella Society’s readalong, although a much delayed addition. The story opens with a happy scene at Hundreds...

Code name Verity by

reread 24th Sept 2018 for my bookclub. And on rereading I still really enjoyed this book. I still think that some of it is a little...

The therapist by

Martin Kobel specialises in helping people. That’s his job, as a therapist, people in need come to him and he helps them. And when he bumps into Annabelle Young at a cafe he sees in her someone he can help. But she hasn’t asked him for help, he passes her his card, hoping that will prompt her to ask for assistance. That doesn’t work. And she is a teacher, her trouble could easily damage a whole class of young impressionable children. He has to do something.

The Wise Man’s Fear by

ISBN: 9780575088078 The Kingkiller Chronicle, Day two Read for the Once Upon a Time V reading challenge, see what every one’s been reading on the review...

Drood by

by Dan Simmons

On the 9th of June, 1865, ten passengers were killed when a train crashed at Staplehurst. Among the passengers who survived the disaster was the novelist Charles Dickens. Meeting his friend, Wilkie Collins, soon afterwards Dickens describes a strange individual he came across at the site of the crash. This man, Drood, is to drag both Dickens and Collins into the depths of Victorian London’s criminal and poverty stricken underbelly. Will he also lead to murder and insanity?

An instance of the fingerpost by

ISBN: 009975181x Read with HistoricalFavorites Marco da Cola, gentleman of Venice, respectfully presents his greetings. This was a wonderful read. When I first started it I...