The King’s Speech

The wireless changed a great many things. Before, all that was required of a monarch was that he look the part, and not fall off his horse. After the king would invade his people’s homes and have to court them with his speech. So King George V of Britain believes, and tells his son. “Bertie” may not be expected to take the throne, but as a member of the royal family he must do his part for duty and the country. And so he is given the job of delivering the closing speech of the Empire exhibit. His older brother, David[1] has performed admirably, as has the king. But Albert has a speech impediment, a stammer. Which of course leads to the feared “dead air”. He visits all sorts of doctors in an attempt to find someone who may be able to help, but it is only when his wife stumbles across Lionel Logue, an Australian actor that he begins to make some progress.

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Linknotes:

  1. the future Edward VIII

Precious

Dir: Lee Daniels
Writ: Geoffrey Fletcher based on the book by Sapphire
Some films you go to see purely for light entertainment. To enjoy the pretty pictures and the mindless action. Precious is not one of those films. It one that you aren’t sure you actually want to see. You know it is going to make you feel uncomfortable, and that it’ll probably pray on your mind after you’ve watched it.