Setting Archive : Ireland

(I try to break stuff down by place and time. Doesnt always work but there you go)

The Unfortunate Fursey
The Unfortunate Fursey by Mervyn Wall

Fursey is a lay brother in Clonmacnoise. The only monastery in Ireland to be unafflicted by demons and other such […]

The Ransom of Dond
featransom

Illustrated by Pam Smy Darra lives on the island of Inniscaul is a small island off the coast of Eriu, […]

Downturn Abbey
Downturn Abbey

Ross O’Carroll-Kelly started life in The Sunday Times and currently stars in The Irish Times, he is a fictional wealthy […]

A week in winter
week in winter

Chicky left her home on the west coast of Ireland and headed off to America after a whirl-wind romance. Full […]

Donegal fairy stories
Donegal fairy stories - Seumas MacManus

I do enjoy fairy stories, of all shapes and sorts. When I was younger I read plenty of the children’s […]

Gabriel’s gate
Gabriel's Gate by Tom Galvin

With the demise of the Celtic Tiger and the onset of the “economic doom and gloom” so popular in the […]

The Islandman

Translated from the Irish (An tOileánach) by Robin Flower Tomás Ó Criomhthain, or, if you’d prefer an anglicised version, Thomas […]

The pink cage

Astrid is a bitch. She doesn’t see herself that way, but as I started this novel I really didn’t like […]

Blood

The unnamed central character of this short story finds himself suddenly craving blood. He can’t understand it, he is a normal person, a normal man, why on earth is this happening to him. He tries to rationalise it, maybe he has an iron deficiency? Or maybe it is a totally misdirected sex-drive? And yet, he continues to find himself being drawn towards blood. Bloody raw steaks, the next-door neighbour’s chickens…

How many miles to Babylon?

ISBN: 9780141046969 ; Quotes Because I am an officer and a gentleman they have given me my notebooks, pen, ink […]

A swift, pure cry

Author: Siobhan Down ISBN: 9780099488163 DDC: 823.92 LibraryThing | Wikipedia | Siobhan Dowd Trust The place brought to mind a […]

Fox, Swallow, Scarecrow

From the new glass bridge which spanned the inscrutable waters of the Grand Canal, the tram purred downhill and glided gently into the heart of the city.
It was the opening of this book that persuaded me to buy it. The way Ní Duibhne pokes fun at that certain class of Dublin people. It made me smile, but because I knew that there really are people who think that way. Or at least there used to be, now with the demise of the Celtic Tiger maybe there are less of them than there once were.