We Own the Night

The Ask and the Answer by

Author: Patrick Ness
Chaos Walking #2
Okay, so I loved and adored the first book in this series, even with its horrible cliff-hanger of an ending. Luckily enough I had this one waiting at work, so I didn’t have long to wait before I found out about what happened next. If you haven’t read the first book you shouldn’t read this one. Just don’t. Put the book down and go look for The Knife of Never Letting Go, you really won’t have a clue what is going on if you don’t.

Just a word of warning, there are *mild* spoilers in this review.

Happy Halloween!

Winter is well and truly here[1] Time for the hat, scarves, and gloves me thinks. Well, if I had a hat. As it is I’m making...

Milk dir. by

Despite my long stated policy of not reading reviews until after I’ve seen a film I’ve come across quite a few views on this film. Mostly positive. Course I didn’t really read any of them. I’m not about to go against my own policy that way. But I did notice the good buzz. So maybe that is why I came out of the cinema a little disappointed at this one.

Changeling dir. by

It is 1920’s Los Angeles and single mother Christine Collins is trying to raise her boy. One Sat she is called in to work and when she returns home little Walter Collins is nowhere to be found. The police set about looking and eventually, after 5 months they bring him back. Only the boy they return to Christine is different; she is, however, informed that those changes are the result of her shock and the boys trauma. Why it is quite the done thing for a boy to shrink 4 inches as a result of such a horrifying encounter. And circumcised now you say? Well it is healthy, and who knows what that drifter may have been thinking. Ms. Collins is not about to rest however. She wants her boy back.

The Assassination of Jesse James by the coward Robert Ford by

He was growing into middle age and was living then in a bungalow on Woodland Avenue. Green weeds split the porch steps, a wasp nest clung to an attic gable, a rope swing looped down from a dying elm tree and the ground below it was scuffed soft as flour.

I think this is one of the rare cases where watching the film version improves your enjoyment of the novel. Maybe because for certain passages I could really here the narrator from the film while I was reading. I think that this might make an excellent audio book. Then again, I’ve never listened to an audio book, so what do I know.

The Wars by

ISBN: 0140050116 See also: The Stay at Home Bookworm ; Wikipedia Prologue She was standing in the middle of the railroad tracks. Her head was bowed...

There Will Be Blood dir. by

It is hard to know how to describe this film. It is more of a character study than a story. Of course there is some plot, an oilman and his desire to suceed, but the story isn’t too important. What is important is the character of Daniel Plainview, as played by Oscar winning Daniel Day-Lewis.

The opening scenes show just how driven Daniel is. We watch him, working on his own, in a mine. No dialogue at all for around 15 minutes, just this man in a hole, digging, dynamiting up the earth, falling down the hole, injured and yet still having the drive to pull himself out of that hole and struggle back into town to get his bit of dirt evaluated.

I am legend [based on the book] by dir. by

After the end of the world as we know it Robert Neville lives in New York. All alone apart from his dog, Sam, he drives around hunting deer, chatting to mannequins and going through the stock of a local video store. He also makes sure to be home and locked away by the time night comes. Because at night the rest of the survivors come out. And they aren’t so friendly.