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1980s

Terminator Genisys dir. by

In the future John Connor sends soldier Kyle Reese back in time to 1984 with the job of protecting Sarah Connor, the …

Foxcatcher dir. by

Mark Schultz (Channing Tatum) won gold at the 1984 Olympics. As did his older brother David (Mark Ruffalo). Now they are in …

Significant Dust by

Vanessa works in a roadhouse in an isolated part of Australia. When we first meet her we don’t know why exactly she’s …

Among others by Jo Walton

Among Others by

Read for the Once Upon a Time VI challenge Many, many moons ago Carl posted his review of this book. And then …

Grave’s end by

In 1982 Elaine Mercado and her family moved from an apartment into what they hoped would be their dream home. This house, …

Nicholas Dane by

This is the sort of book I don’t usually read. You know the ones, from the “sad story” section of the bookshop. The misery-books as I call them. But a few years ago I’d heard of Melvin Burgess as an author to look out for. I’ve read his Lady : My life as a Bitch and to be honest I wasn’t all that impressed, but I’ll always give an author a second go. So I tried this one.

In the 1980’s Nick Dane is growing up as an average, if bright kid. He comes from a single parent family, and his mother has a secret. She never got off the drugs, not completely. And in the course of having a “taste” she accidentally overdoses and Nick is left all alone in the world. Soon he finds himself carted off to a “home” for boys, and soon learns that the violence and random beatings are not the worse this place has to offer.

A swift, pure cry by

Author: Siobhan Down ISBN: 9780099488163 DDC: 823.92 LibraryThing | Wikipedia | Siobhan Dowd Trust The place brought to mind a sinking ship. …

We Own the Night dir. by

Bobby is a night club manager. It is the 1980’s, New York. Life is good. Until the day his brother comes calling. …

The Lives of Others dir. by

In 1984 in East Germany the secret police, or Stasi were everywhere, watching everything. This film details the activities of one officer, Wiesler, as he monitored a popular playwright. Wiesler doesn’t believe that Dreyman could possibly be as pro the party as he makes out. Too arrogant. So he suggests keeping him under surveillance, just in case. His superior officer doesn’t agree, at first, but then Minister Bruno Hempf mentions that perhaps he isn’t such a fan, and that perhaps Dreyman isn’t a favourite. It turns out that Hempf is more than interested in Dreyman’s girlfriend, the actress Christa-Maria Sieland, and so would like nothing better than to remove his rival by having him arrested and taken away.